FREQUENTLY-ASKED QUESTIONS
==========================
Below are some Doom-related questions or comments I've received from visitors
to my websites.  I thought they were reasonable questions that someone else
might ask some day, so decided to include them here.
Many of the questions/comments here are several years old now.  Most have been
paraphrased, or have been broken down into smaller subtopics.  Occasionally
questions are added, deleted, or rearranged, and answers may be updated from
time to time.

Questions/comments on other games and/or my websites are currently located at
http://Ledmeister.com/othrfaqs.htm

Last update: March 18, 2007

DOOM/DOOM II/FINAL DOOM GAMES
=============================
Q: "Why don't the classic PC Doom games run well on my Windows (XP) machine?"
Q: "I'm stuck in a particular level, and can't find the key/exit/switch."
Q: "I saved my game on the Boss map of Doom II, and it crashes when I load it!"
Q: "Why don't you have walkthroughs for Doom 95?"
Q: "I have a question/comment about one of your full-game walkthroughs."
Q: "Which is better, a computer-based Doom game, or a console Doom game?"
Q: "Which computer-based Doom game is better?"
Q: "What's your favorite computer Doom game?"
Q: "What's your least favorite computer Doom game?"
Q: "Which game-console version of Doom is better?"
Q: "What's your favorite console Doom game?"
Q: "What's your least favorite console Doom game?"
Q: "What's your opinion of each of the console/handheld versions?"
Q: "I've heard that Doom exists for the Atari 2600.  Is this true?"
Q: "I've heard that some GBA Doom/Doom II Game Paks are counterfeit."
Q: "What is Doom like on Xbox 360 Live Arcade?"
Q: "Are the maps in the console/handheld games like the maps in the PC games?"
Q: "You say some of the JagDoom maps are heavily edited.  How so?"
Q: "Do the special PlayStation/Saturn/N64 Doom maps exist for the PC?"
Q: "Is the Doom 64 Total Conversion for the PC exactly like the N64 game?"
Q: "Why doesn't your site cover Doom games for PSP/Dreamcast/Gamepark/other?"
Q: "Why do your Doom documents state that Doom II has only one Episode?"
Q: "In my Doom II game, I never saw all of the enemies mentioned in DOOMCOMP."
Q: "Which items actually affect the 'Items' score?"
Q: "How do I get a 100% Items score on the first level of Doom/Ultimate Doom?"
Q: "The secrets-count guide has the numbers wrong for a bunch of maps."
Q: "Why aren't there Arch-Viles in PlayStation Doom or Saturn Doom?"
Q: "Where is the double-barrelled shotgun in PlayStation Doom/Saturn Doom?"
Q: "Where is the Spider Mastermind in PlayStation Final Doom?"
Q: "Where are the secret levels in PlayStation Final Doom?"
Q: "Why is Doom 64 so dark?"/"Why do people say it's too dark when it isn't?"
Q: "Is Saturn Doom 'Deathmatch-Ready' like it says on the box?"
Q: "You say JagDoom Deathmatch is unreliable, but it works okay for me."
Q: "Can GBA Doom/Doom II Deathmatch or Co-Op games be played wirelessly?"
Q: "I've never tried playing a Deathmatch or Co-Op game."
Q: "Hey, those PlayStation/Saturn/other cheat codes don't work!"
Q: "In your PC Doom cheats, isn't 'Alt-tiddt' supposed to be 'Alt-iddt'?"
Q: "In the Doom 95 cheat codes, what does the 'fh' prefix mean?"
Q: "How/where did you get those Doom level passwords?"
Q: "Where are the passwords for PSX/Saturn Doom level 60?"
Q: "How did you get those map images for the DOOMMAPS resource?"
Q: "Where can I get the shareware version of Doom II?"
Q: "Will you send me the full commercial version of Doom/Doom II/other?"
Q: "Is there a patch to fix that error in PC Final Doom/TNT map 31: PHARAOH?"
Q: "While no-clipping in PC Final Doom, I found a 'Doom guy' in a tiny room!"
Q: "Where can I get more information on Doom games?"
Q: "Will you add my link to your website?"
Q: "Do you plan to support the Doom 3 games?"

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Send e-mail to: Ledmeister
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Q: "Why don't the classic PC Doom games run well on my Windows (XP) machine?"
A: PC Doom, Ultimate Doom, Doom II, and Final Doom (TNT/Evilution and Plutonia)
   are all DOS-based games.  DOS is an old operating system predating Windows.
   Microsoft had supported DOS and Windows for years, but support for DOS-based
   applications has steadily declined.
   Windows XP and other modern versions of Windows are less backward-compatible
   with DOS applications than previous versions.  This can cause problems with
   sound, music, graphics and input devices when running the original, classic
   Doom/Doom II game engines.
   Today there are third-party Doom engines, "source ports", which allow these
   old games to run well under Windows XP and other modern operating systems.
   Most source ports fix various bugs or limitations in the original games, and
   provide other enhancements or expanded capabilities as well.
   Some source ports, such as Chocolate Doom, are strictly designed to maintain
   the look and feel of the original games; Others, such as JDoom, allow the
   use of updated graphics to "modernize" the look of the game.
   Most source ports are freely available on the web.  Links to the home pages
   of some of these can be found here.
   Back to Top

Q: "I'm stuck in a particular level, and can't find the key/exit/switch."
A: If you didn't already, you may want to check out the DOOMMAPS resource, the
   DOOMHELP page or the full game walkthroughs.  If you're still stuck, or
   you're looking for a demo walkthrough (LMP file), feel free to email me.
   For solutions to puzzles in classic PC Doom games, I can usually provide a
   "no-monsters" demo the same day I receive a request.  (For an introduction
   to demos and LMP files, click here; for information on playing demo files,
   click here.)
   Written walkthroughs for levels can take longer, depending on how complex
   the solution is.  If I don't have time to quickly write up a walkthrough, I
   will try to provide a link to other online sources of help or information.
   Back to Top

Q: "I saved my game on the Boss map of Doom II, and it crashes when I load it!"
A: The "Boss" entity in Doom II-based games (Doom II, Final Doom TNT/Plutonia)
   can create a save/load problem for that level in the game.  If you save your
   progress on that level after the Boss has detected (seen/heard) you, that
   saved file may cause a crash if you start a new game and reload that file.
   The best way to prevent this problem is to save and load on that level only
   during a single unbroken gaming session.  Or, save your game on that level
   only at a point before the Boss detects you.
   If your save-game file crashes when you load it, then I'd suggest starting a
   new game at the same Skill level, and use the "idclev" cheat code to jump
   ahead to that map; then immediately save the game, overwriting the corrupted
   file.  Details on the idclev code can be found in the DOOMCODE document.
   Back to Top

Q: "Why don't you have walkthroughs for Doom 95?"
A: Doom 95 is not one specific game by itself; Essentially it is just an early
   Windows "source port" and "front end", allowing the original PC DOS Doom
   games to be configured and run with some improvements in a Win95-compatible
   environment.
   Doom 95 can be used with any classic PC Doom/Doom II/Final Doom games that
   you already own, and those are addressed individually on the DOOMHELP page,
   and are covered in depth by the full-game walkthroughs.
   Back to Top

Q: "I have a question/comment about one of your full-game walkthroughs."
A: The full-game walkthroughs are by Tim "Peach Freak" Brastow.  I've provided
   some answers and resources for his FAQs, but he is the hard-working author.
   His contact information can be found at the top of his documents.
   Back to Top

Q: "Which is better, a computer-based Doom game, or a console Doom game?"
A: My personal opinion: If you don't mind sitting at your computer for hours on
   end, and its CPU is a decent 486 or better, buy a computer version.  And I'd
   recommend starting with Ultimate Doom.
   A computer version is more flexible and versatile than any console version,
   allows multiplayer Deathmatches (great fun), allows importing of new sounds
   and graphics, and there's literally a lifetime's worth of third-party map
   levels to fight through.  Furthermore, the PC source code has been released
   to the public, and this has led to new and improved PC Doom engines ("source
   ports") and add-ons from third-party developers.
   On the other hand, it's easy to plug a game console into an entertainment
   center... and kicking back on the couch for a late-night session of Doom 64
   or PSX Final Doom on a large TV with the sound pumping through a stereo is
   pretty cool. :)  So if a bigger visceral experience is what you're looking
   for, check into one of the console Doom games.
   Back to Top

Q: "Which computer-based Doom game is better?"
A: They're all good.  Doom II: Hell on Earth, and Doom II-based games such as
   Final Doom, include more monster types than you'll find in Doom 1 or
   Ultimate Doom.  Doom II games also include one extra weapon for the player,
   the double-barreled shotgun.  Otherwise, all of these games are more alike
   than they are different.
   The full commercial version of PC Doom 1 has three 9-map Episodes; Ultimate
   Doom has those same 3 Episodes, plus a fourth 9-map Episode.  Doom II: Hell
   on Earth has one 32-map Episode; Final Doom contains two separate Doom II
   games, and each one has its own 32-map Episode.
   Most folks agree that Final Doom (especially the "Plutonia" Episode) is the
   hardest to beat among these games.  Opinions vary as to which game has the
   "best" map levels.
   Anyway, for first-time PC Doomers, I'd personally recommend starting with
   Ultimate Doom, then Doom II: Hell on Earth, then Final Doom... And if you're
   not sick of Doom by then, there are plenty of other maps out there that can
   be used with any of the Doom or Doom II engines.
   Back to Top

Q: "What's your favorite computer Doom game?"
A: That's hard to answer... I've got great memories associated with all the PC
   Doom games.  If I could only pick one Doom software package, it'd probably
   be Final Doom for the PC.  It's got 64 maps and most of the Doom II enemies.
   But I'd still miss having the older games.
   Back to Top

Q: "What's your least favorite computer Doom game?"
A: Anything on a Macintosh.  I swear, I can hardly get within arms-length of
   ANY Mac before it crashes.  On more than one occasion I've even apparently
   caused crashes on other people's Macs as I'm talking to them over the phone:
      "Hey!  My Mac just hung."
      "Well, I told you not to put me on speakerphone; Macs hate me."
   Actually, to clarify: Doom on a Mac isn't any worse than Doom on a PC; I
   just have a problem with Macs in general.  But from carefully observing at a
   distance, I've seen other people play MacDoom without any complications.
   Back to Top

Q: "Which game-console version of Doom is better?"
A: Well, no one version has a monopoly on good features... so it really boils
   down to: What are you looking for in a Doom game?  Some console Doom games
   have more maps, or more accurately-copied maps, than others; some have more
   monster types than others; some are multiplayer, some aren't, and so on.
   See DOOMCOMP for a look at the basic features of most console Doom games; Or
   tell me what you want in a Doom game, and I'll try to make a recommendation.
   Back to Top

Q: "What's your favorite console Doom game?"
A: My long-time personal favorite was always PlayStation Doom from 1995.  It
   was much better than previous console-Doom ports (and some future ones) due
   to its large number of maps and monsters, its rock-solid multiplayer link
   ability, the new atmospheric music, and a handful of new custom maps.
   My list of favorites grew over the years to include PlayStation Final Doom
   in 1996, and N64 Doom 64 (which is not like traditional Doom games, but fun
   and interesting nonetheless) in 1997.
   Today the best traditional console port of Doom (actually Ultimate Doom) is
   the Xbox 360 version, available over Xbox Live Arcade as of September 2006.
   Currently my favorite console ports of Doom II, and Doom II Master Levels,
   are included as bonus games with Xbox Doom 3: Resurrection of Evil, released
   in 2005.
   Back to Top

Q: "What's your least favorite console Doom game?"
A: 3DO Doom.  That choppy, wildly-alternating frame rate drives me nuts.  If it
   wasn't for that one big problem, it'd be a much better game.
   I once heard a rumor that the version that appeared on store shelves was a
   beta version, mastered instead of the final version by mistake.  This would
   explain much, but seems unlikely at best.
   Back to Top

Q: "What's your opinion of each of the console/handheld versions?"
A: See the DOOMCUT page.
   Back to Top

Q: "I've heard that Doom exists for the Atari 2600.  Is this true?"
A: No.  Although claims of the game's existence (and even "screen shots" of the
   game) have been circulated around the web, Doom has never been converted to
   Atari-2600 format by anyone.
   Actually, aside from its possible novelty value, I'm not sure why anyone
   would even want an Atari-2600 version of the game.  Even the "worst" of the
   currently existing console Doom games would eclipse it in every way.
   -----
   Addendum: Some months later and the "official word" finally came down:
   "Surprise surprise, it was all a hoax."  (Oh no, really?! ;)
   If anyone's still interested, you can read more about the whole thing here
   (the hoaxer's own page), or here (a Gamespot article about it).
   Back to Top

Q: "I've heard that some GBA Doom/Doom II Game Paks are counterfeit."
A: Counterfeit GBA Game Paks do exist, and may or may not contain exact copies
   of the original commercial software.  Counterfeits are mostly found overseas
   or through unscrupulous sellers on eBay and other online auction houses.
   If you don't want to risk getting stuck with a home-brewed cartridge (of any
   game), your best bet is to stay with large, well-established retail stores
   and online sellers, such as Best Buy, Wal-Mart, Toys R Us, amazon.com, etc.
   If you're looking for GBA Doom/Doom II on eBay, I'd strongly recommend going
   with a seller who has a 99% or 100% Feedback rating, with several previous
   sales.  For best results try to find a new, factory-sealed, unopened game.
   Barring that, get clear pictures of the actual cartridge before buying.
   For North America Nintendo produced Doom/Doom II Paks that looked like this:
   GBA Doom: Front / GBA Doom II: Front / GBA Doom and Doom II: Back
   If you look into the open end of an official Game Pak, you should see white
   lettering just behind the contact points on the exposed edge of the circuit
   board (looking something like this), specifying it as a Nintendo product.
   (Note that the phrase "pictured item not for sale" across these images is to
   discourage their use on eBay or other online auction sites.)
   Back to Top

Q: "What is Doom like on Xbox 360 Live Arcade?"
A: It's a very accurate copy of the 4-Episode PC "Ultimate Doom" game (a better
   copy, in fact, than the earlier ports of Ultimate Doom that were packaged in
   with the Xbox Doom 3 games).
   You can try the first level of the first Episode (map E1M1) for free, but
   you'll need to pay to unlock the full 36-map game.  As of this writing the
   cost for the full game is 400 points, about 5 US dollars.
   Both versions support split-screen multiplayer games on a single console;
   the paid version adds full-screen play over Xbox Live for Gold subscribers.
   For more information see the DOOMCUT page.
   Back to Top

Q: "Are the maps in the console/handheld games like the maps in the PC games?"
A: In Xbox 360 Live Arcade Doom, and in Tapwave Zodiac Doom II: Yes.  In the
   "Classic Doom" games included with the Xbox Doom 3 games, and in SNES Doom:
   Basically yes.  In Doom II for the Game Boy Advance: Yes, with exceptions.
   In Doom 64 for the Nintendo 64: No.
   With the other game-console ports, the answer gets a bit more complicated...
   Doom for the Sega Genesis 32X was one of the earliest game-console ports of
   the original PC Doom game.  The 17 maps in this Sega game are similar to 17
   of the 27 maps that were in PC Doom 1; However, all of the maps used in the
   Sega game were edited down so that they would use less memory space and/or
   would be less taxing on the game engine.  The amount of editing varied from
   map to map: In some maps only certain textures and unimportant objects were
   omitted; in other maps large sections were simply cut away (multiple rooms,
   hallways, secret areas, etc.), or were reconfigured.
   Atari Jaguar Doom ("JagDoom") has a total of 24 maps, including the same 17
   edited Sega 32X maps, plus 5 more edited-down versions of maps that appeared
   in PC Doom, and 2 maps that do not appear in any PC Doom/Doom II game.  This
   24-map group is often referred to on this site as the "JagDoom mapset".
   3DO Doom uses the entire JagDoom mapset and includes no other maps.
   Game Boy Advance Doom uses the entire JagDoom mapset, but also includes 8
   Deathmatch-only bonus maps (maps 25 through 32) that do not appear in any PC
   Doom/Doom II games, or any other game-console or handheld port.
   PlayStation Doom incorporates the JagDoom mapset into its "ULTIMATE DOOM"
   Episode, along with 5 more maps that were copied with somewhat greater
   accuracy from the 4th Episode of PC Ultimate Doom, and a few other maps that
   do not appear in any PC Doom game.  PlayStation Doom's "DOOM II" Episode
   includes 23 maps that were copied with fairly good accuracy from PC Doom II,
   and a few other maps that do not appear in any PC Doom/Doom II game.
   Sega Saturn Doom uses the same 59 maps that are used for PlayStation Doom.
   Super Nintendo Doom ("SNES Doom") has 22 maps, all of which were copied with
   relatively high accuracy from 22 of the 27 maps found in PC Doom 1.  The map
   layouts are much more complete and accurate than those in the JagDoom mapset
   used in many of the other game-console ports... and while floor and ceiling
   textures are missing from all SNES Doom maps, the wall textures more closely
   resemble those used in the original PC game.
   Game Boy Advance Doom II has all of the maps and most of the textures from
   the original PC Doom II game, but a couple of maps have major edits (large
   sections cut away), and a few more have strategically placed barriers to cut
   down on the maximum number of objects that need to be drawn at any given
   time.  Also, the PC Doom II maps INDUSTRIAL ZONE and THE CHASM each had to
   be split into 2 "half" maps in this game.  Other than that, most of the maps
   remain true in look and layout to the original PC Doom II maps.
   For the most part, the 32 maps in N64 Doom 64 are unique, and are unlike any
   of the maps found in PC Doom/Doom II, or any other game-console Doom game.
   The 30 maps found in Final Doom for the PlayStation come from two separate
   sources: 17 maps were copied from the 64-map PC version of Final Doom; and
   13 maps were copied from a 21-map "Master Levels" collection released for PC
   Doom II.  All of these maps were copied with fair to high accuracy.
   The maps in Xbox Ultimate Doom and Doom II (as included with the Xbox Doom 3
   games) are, for the most part, identical to those in the equivalent v1.9 PC
   games; but each game adds one additional map not found in the PC originals.
   Xbox Master Levels (bundled with Xbox Doom 3: Resurrection of Evil) includes
   18 maps from the PC "Master Levels" collection, all of which were copied
   with high accuracy (except for the omission of the starry skies/backgrounds
   found in many of the PC maps).
   Xbox 360 Live Arcade Doom uses the exact mapset from PC Ultimate Doom v1.9.
   Tapwave Zodiac Doom II uses the exact mapset from PC Doom II Hell on Earth.
   For a quick-reference glance at which maps are similar between PC Doom games
   and the console/handheld ports, see COMPMAPS.
   Back to Top

Q: "You say some of the JagDoom maps are heavily edited.  How so?"
A: Some maps are similar to their PC counterparts, others are very different.
   Here is a page I put together showing some sample Automap screens from PC
   Ultimate Doom, and equivalent levels from the JagDoom mapset.
   Back to Top

Q: "Do the special PlayStation/Saturn/N64 Doom maps exist for the PC?"
A: I've talked with creators and designers at id, Williams, and Midway, and the
   answers I'd received were that the maps are the property of Williams/Midway,
   and they were never made available anywhere to the public as PC-compatible
   WAD files, nor are there plans to ever publish them as such.
   However, some talented Doom enthusiasts have created their own versions of
   these maps and, in general, they are faithful reproductions.
   Source ports, such as ZDoom, are required in order to use some of these.
   You can find links to the console Doom maps, and to various source ports, on
   the Doom links page.
   Back to Top

Q: "Is the Doom 64 Total Conversion for the PC exactly like the N64 game?"
A: The Doom 64 TC is a great piece of work, but it is not an exact copy of the
   N64 original.  There are several differences, ranging from minor to major,
   including differences in overall number and types of monsters, arrangement
   (playing-order) of levels, number and location of "official" secret areas on
   certain maps, and so on.
   You can get the Doom 64 TC here, and find level walkthroughs and maps here.
   Back to Top

Q: "Why doesn't your site cover Doom for PSP/Dreamcast/Gamepark/other?"
A: There are several third-party, or "home-brew", Doom ports for a wide variety
   of other consoles and handheld devices; But some of these are, by nature, in
   an unfinished state, or are subject to unannounced modifications or updates.
   Many of these also require the end-user to download and install additional
   software, some of which is also subject to revision at any time.
   The general goal for this site is to cover only the "classic" (pre-Doom 3)
   Doom games commercially released as finished products by Id Software and/or
   licensed parties.
   Back to Top

Q: "Why do your Doom documents state that Doom II has only one Episode?"
A: In most Doom II games, intermission screens of story-related text are shown
   between certain maps, and some see this as a transition between Episodes.
   I usually use the term "Episode" to define any group of maps that has one
   distinct starting map (where a player normally begins a new game), and one
   ending map where gameplay will halt after the player achieves a goal.
   A text-screen intermission in Doom II doesn't really affect gameplay; the
   player resumes on the next map as usual, with the health, armor, weapons and
   ammo the player had when exiting the previous map.  As such, gameplay can
   progress through all maps included in Doom II, from the game's one starting
   map to its one ending map.
   Back to Top

Q: "In my Doom II game, I never saw all of the enemies mentioned in DOOMCOMP."
A: Excluding enemy players in multiplayer games, there are a total of 20 enemy
   types in the PC, GBA, Zodiac and Xbox "Doom II: Hell on Earth" games; But
   some of them are encountered rarely, or not at all, during normal game play.
   In addition to the 17 common enemy types seen in many of the levels, there
   are three more, seen only in special levels.  Specifically, the "SS Officer"
   enemies populating the WOLFENSTEIN and GROSSE levels, the "Commander Keen"
   figures at the exit of the GROSSE level, and the "John Romero" enemy on the
   final level.
   An "SS Officer" (a blue-dressed, machine-gun-toting human, cloned from the
   "Wolfenstein 3D" games) is an enemy in the usual sense, roughly equivalent
   to the Chaingunner/"Heavy Weapon Dude" enemy type.
   "Commander Keen" (the now-subdued protagonist from an earlier game of the
   same name) almost doesn't qualify as an "enemy" or "monster", as it cannot
   move or attack.  (In fact, it's just barely a step above being a common
   projectile-activated switch.)  However, the figure can be damaged and killed
   like any other monster, it will re-spawn if killed when a "respawn monsters"
   parameter is active, and, conversely, it will be prevented from appearing in
   the game at all if a "no monsters" parameter is active.  (These parameters
   can be turned on and off in the original PC games.)
   The "John Romero" enemy is hidden behind the demon-faced facade in the main
   combat area of the final level.  It is similar to the "Commander Keen" enemy
   in that it is immobile, it can be hurt like any other monster in the game,
   and its death can cause other events to occur; And it is different, in that
   it will attack players (by proxy, releasing other monsters to do the job),
   and, being the final Boss, its existence is not affected by a "respawn" or
   "no monsters" parameter.  (Incidentally, the monsters created by the "John
   Romero" entity are also unaffected by those parameters.)
   -----
   Addendum: Those familiar with the PC Doom II program code may know that the
   "Boss" (or "Baphomet") is actually more complex than what is described
   above... I'm only referring to what a player superficially sees/experiences.
   Back to Top

Q: "Which items actually affect the 'Items' score?"
A: In PC Doom and Ultimate Doom, the following items are counted in the ITEMS
   score shown on the Tally screen: Berserk Pack, Blur Artifact (also called
   Partial Invisibility), Computer Map (also called Computer Area Map), Health
   Potion (blue bottle, also called Health Bonus), Invulnerability Artifact
   (green sphere), Light Amplification Visor, Soul Sphere (blue sphere, also
   called Supercharge), and Spiritual Armor (green helmet, also called Armor
   Bonus).  All other retrievable objects/items/power-ups/etc. are ignored.
   PC Doom II and Final Doom games score those same items, and also a new item
   type, the Megasphere (beige sphere).
   Most game-console and handheld Doom/Doom II games score items the same way;
   But some, such as GBA Doom II, also count additional items and power-ups.
   Back to Top

Q: "How do I get a 100% Items score on the first level of Doom/Ultimate Doom?"
   On Doom/Ultimate Doom's first map, score-affecting Items include only blue
   health potions and green armor helmets; everything else can be ignored.
   Some of the armor helmets are located in a hidden area, which is accessible
   via a secret elevator.
   For a quick-reference map that shows where to find all score-affecting Items
   on the first level of the game, click here.  (This map applies to PC Doom/
   Ultimate Doom, and to all accurate game-console ports, such as the Xbox and
   Xbox 360 games.)
   Back to Top

Q: "The secrets-count guide has the numbers wrong for a bunch of maps."
A: It's commonly thought that each well-hidden area on a given map is scored as
   a "Secret" by the game, and that every openly-accessible area is not.
   However almost all Doom/Doom II games have maps where well-hidden items and
   areas have no effect on the player's score.  Beyond that, some open areas on
   some maps in some games are flagged as Secret, and will affect the score.
   The MAXSEC quick-reference guide only addresses the map areas that actually
   affect the score; any other hidden areas or items on each map are ignored.
   Because of this, the counts in the MAXSEC guide may not match those seen in
   some "official" printed guidebooks and/or various other player-authored FAQs
   and walkthroughs.
   Back to Top

Q: "Why aren't there Arch-Viles in PlayStation Doom or Saturn Doom?"
A: Background: The PC Doom II games feature a few enemies which are not found
   in the "Doom II" Episodes of PSX or Saturn Doom.  Most notably, the popular
   Arch-Vile (a fast monster with a powerful attack and an ability to resurrect
   dead monsters) was left out.
   I talked with someone who worked on the PlayStation Doom project, and he
   tells me that the Arch-Vile just added way too many frames of animation; it
   was just "too big" for the limitations of PSX Doom.  (In PC Doom II games
   there's over 150 separate images associated with the Arch-Vile.)
   It's not in Saturn Doom because that game is, figuratively speaking, just a
   grainy photocopy of PSX Doom... Little attempt was made to change or improve
   the game over the PlayStation original.
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Q: "Where is the double-barrelled shotgun in PlayStation Doom/Saturn Doom?"
A: In the "ULTIMATE DOOM" Episode of the game, the "super shotgun" only appears
   on map 57, THE MARSHES (a secret level).  In the "DOOM II" Episode, it can
   first be found on map 32, UNDERHALLS, and then on several maps afterwards.
   You can also add it to your inventory on any map by using cheat codes (see
   DOOMCODE) or special passwords (see PSXD1SSG, DOOMPAS7 or DOOMPAS2).
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Q: "Where is the Spider Mastermind in PlayStation Final Doom?"
A: While the Spider Mastermind enemy is seen in the "Cast of characters" at the
   end of the game, it doesn't actually appear in the game.
   That cast sequence was simply copied from the earlier PlayStation Doom game,
   where that enemy does appear.
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Q: "Where are the secret levels in PlayStation Final Doom?"
A: There aren't any.  If you've found an inaccessible "secret exit" on map 23
   (BALLISTYX), it's actually a Deathmatch-only exit, which leads to level 24,
   just like the regular exit does.
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Q: "Why is Doom 64 so dark?"/"Why do people say it's too dark when it isn't?"
A: Every once in a while I see the following conversation (more or less) pop up
   between various game players in some corner of cyberspace:
      "I like Doom 64, but the screen is way too dark."
      "So adjust the brightness option in the game."
      "I already did that.  It's still way too dark."
      "Then turn up the brightness control on your TV."
      "I did that too; It's still too dark."
   Sometimes the discussion goes further:
      "Then get a new TV."
   And about half the time, the response is:
      "It IS a new TV.  Now what?"
   Unfortunately it is ultimately the TV that determines whether or not Doom 64
   can be made bright enough.
   In my own experience, I've played Doom 64 on two different 27-inch Sony
   Trinitron TVs.  Both TVs display regular television pictures just fine.  But
   on one TV, Doom 64 is plenty bright enough; On the other, it's very dark...
   Even with the game's brightness control and the TV's brightness control both
   at maximum, it's still difficult to see my virtual hand in front of my
   virtual face.
   If Doom 64 is too dark for you, and all the brightness controls have little
   or no effect, try a different TV.  Failing that, make the room as dark as
   possible, having the TV as your only light source.  This will help your eyes
   dilate to gather in more light from the game screen.  (Just don't sue me if
   you go blind. ;)
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Q: "Is Saturn Doom 'Deathmatch-Ready' like it says on the box?"
A: Yes and no... There are different Saturn Doom games by different developers.
   An NTSC edition of Doom for the Sega Saturn was developed by Rage Software,
   and released in North America by GT Interactive in 1997.  This edition is
   the game that's covered on this website, and it's strictly 1-player, despite
   notes to the contrary found on the back of the box, and in GT Interactive's
   early FAQ on the game.
   Two overseas editions of the game, by different developers, are multiplayer.
   For details, check out http://www.segacollection.com/specials/doomlink.html
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Q: "You say JagDoom Deathmatch is unreliable, but it works okay for me."
A: Great!  Some people do get lucky.  If you're one of 'em, congratulations. :)
   But, the odds are greater that players will run into trouble.
   In my own experience, a few JagDoom Deathmatch and Co-Op games have run for
   half-hour intervals or longer with no problem.  But I've also had Deathmatch
   and Co-Op games crash and reset every few seconds.  (And this is true when
   using either a Jaglink interface or Catbox connections.)
   If you're looking for a second Jaguar and a copy of JagDoom so you can play
   Deathmatch with your friends, all I can say is Buyer Beware, you're taking a
   gamble.  Even the JagDoom manual states that linked games will be unstable.
   For console multiplayer games I'd instead recommend trying Xbox 360 Doom, or
   PlayStation Doom or Final Doom (for original old-style PlayStations, not
   PSOnes, PS2s or PS3s).  For handheld multiplayer Doom games, look for Doom
   or Doom II for GameBoy Advance SP.
   For more information on all these games, see DOOMCOMP, and the DOOMCUT page.
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Q: Can GBA Doom/Doom II Deathmatch or Co-Op games be played wirelessly?"
A: No, you'll need to use original GBAs or GBA SPs (in any combination), and
   GBA link cables.  (For more information see the relevent sections of the GBA
   game manuals for Doom and Doom II.)
   Multiplayer GBA Doom/Doom II games won't work with GBA wireless adapters, or
   with the built-in wireless ability of the Nintendo DS handhelds.
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Q: "I've never tried playing a Deathmatch or Co-Op game."
A: Deathmatch adds a whole new dimension to Doom, allowing you to fight against
   other human opponents in the Doom environment.  Odds are, if you liked Doom,
   you'll get a big kick out of Deathmatching, especially if you start getting
   good at it.
   If you want to try Deathmatching with your friends, but would rather use a
   game console, I'd highly recommend using the PlayStation ("PSX") system, and
   PSX Doom or PSX Final Doom.  Remember that you need 2 PlayStation consoles
   (original PlayStations, not PSOnes or PS2s), 2 TVs, 2 copies of the chosen
   Doom game, and a PlayStation Link cable or compatible third-party cable.
   Another choice would be Doom or Doom II for the Game Boy Advance.  Both GBA
   games allow 2 to 4 players in Deathmatch games, or 2 players in Co-Op games
   (although both can be a bit sluggish compared to the PC/console versions).
   Again, you need a GBA and a Doom/Doom II Game Pak for each player, and from
   one to three GBA link cables, depending on the number of players.
   Computer-based Doom/Doom II games give you the option of including monsters
   in Deathmatches.  (I often choose to include monsters, as they add a little
   more unpredictability.)  The computer-based games also allow at least 4
   players when using a LAN.
   Most console Doom games support only 2 players (the GBA and Xbox games allow
   up to 4), and none of them include monsters in Deathmatches; But this still
   leaves room for hours of mayhem.
   Another multiplayer option on some systems is the Cooperative (or "Co-Op")
   game, which allows you and your friend(s) to team up against the monsters.
   Actually, I think this feature is underrated... It can be a lot of fun to
   play Doom with an ally, especially in the computer-based Doom games, which
   allow you to load in external maps that neither of you have played before.
   Anyway, in conclusion: If you're a Doom fan, but have never tried a
   Deathmatch or Co-Op game, be sure to try it at least once in your life.
   -----
   Addendum: Years later Xbox 360 Doom is released, providing both split-screen
   play, and full-screen play over broadband for members of Xbox Live Gold.
   The split-screen play is quick and stable for all the Xbox games covered on
   this site; But split-screen is really only at its best on large TVs, and if
   you don't mind your friends being able to watch what you're doing. :)
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Q: "Hey, those PlayStation/Saturn/other cheat codes don't work!"
A: Yes they do. :)  However, you may have to try a code a few times in a row
   before the game will accept it.
   Sometimes codes are rejected for no readily apparent reason.  This seems to
   happen most often with PlayStation Doom: You carefully enter the code once
   or twice, and nothing happens.
   All I can suggest is that you keep trying them during different times in the
   game.  If they still don't work, re-read the entire section of DOOMCODE that
   pertains to your game.  Did you copy down the code accurately?  Double-check
   the "Key" at the end of the cheat section (if applicable), to make sure
   you're using the right buttons.  Also, make sure that the game is paused (if
   applicable) each time before entering the code.
   Other suggestions if you're still having trouble:
   1) Power down your machine and try hooking up a different controller... Use
   the controller that came with the system if possible.  Failing that, use the
   newest controller you have.  Try to avoid using third-party controllers or
   controllers with non-standard features.
   2) Try asking someone else to enter the code, and see if they have the same
   problem.  Oddly enough, this can sometimes make a difference.
   3) Is a Game Shark or other third-party device attached to your game system?
   If so, power down your system and remove the device before trying the codes.
   4) If you're only trying one specific code, then try some of the others.
   Check to see if just one, some, or all of the codes are failing.  This may
   help in diagnosing the problem.
   If you still have trouble, let me know.
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Q: "In your PC Doom cheats, isn't 'Alt-tiddt' supposed to be 'Alt-iddt'?"
A: Well, Alt-iddt works too, and is in fact the "original" syntax of the code.
   But a minor problem with the original syntax is that Alt-iddt typed once by
   itself in a multiplayer game does nothing but toggle Talk mode on (if it's
   currently off); the map display remains unchanged.
   With the new syntax, a leading "t" in the code also toggles Talk mode, but
   now the rest of the code you type is executed instead of ignored.  I feel
   that the code is slightly faster and, ultimately, more versatile this way.
   (Incidentally, I don't recommend cheating in multiplayer games, unless your
   opponent agrees in advance to it; Otherwise it's a good way to make an enemy
   while dulling your own Deathmatch skills in the process.)
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Q: "In the Doom 95 cheat codes, what does the 'fh' prefix mean?"
A: The prefix stands for "F"red "H"ommel, the Doom 95 author who created the
   codes (and who was generous enough to give me the scoop on their existence).
   Incidentally, the "hall" in "fhhall" refers to Jason Hall, CEO of Monolith,
   who requested that particular cheat (hence the "BY REQUEST..." message that
   displays when the code is executed).
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Q: "How/where did you get those Doom level passwords?"
A: I generated all of the passwords that appear on my site, with the exception
   of some of the Doom 64 minimum-start passwords for maps 2 through 32, which
   were openly released to the public by Midway Home Entertainment, and the
   Hectic-demo password for Doom 64.
   I originally started generating passwords for PlayStation Doom, because I
   wanted working passwords for levels 55 through 59 at all skill levels, and I
   wanted them all to start the player with the default health and equipment
   status.  To get those I linked two PlayStations together, started a Co-Op
   game, and left one player character somewhere safe, while I took the other
   player and completed each level which exits to a secret level.  When the
   active character exits, the inactive character gets a password that reflects
   his default-start status.  I took those passwords and used them in the
   PlayStation section of DOOMCODE.  Then, with those 20 passwords and a few
   more I generated at lower levels, I extrapolated the rest of the passwords
   by writing a program to track and predict the mathematical patterns in the
   passwords... Basically, I did it the hard way for PlayStation Doom.
   The day I bought PSX Final Doom, I realized that it used the same passwords
   as regular PSX Doom, so that took care of itself.
   Same thing with Saturn Doom: It uses the same passwords as in PSX Doom.
   Later I decided to try to build passwords for maximum starting status in PSX
   Doom... so I started a new game, switched on invincibility, then played the
   game like normal.  By level 2 you can get a backpack, and use the Add-Ammo
   cheat to maximize weapons, ammo and armor.  Then pick up the Soul Sphere to
   boost health to 200%.  Now when you exit level 2 you get a password that
   lets you start on level 3 with a maximized starting status.  From there I
   just played a few rounds, being sure to exit each map with maximum stuff.
   Then I used the same pattern extrapolation techniques with those seed codes
   to generate all the rest of the passwords.  And those passwords could of
   course be used with PSX Final Doom and Saturn Doom as well.
   For Doom 64 I started with a password that was being trumpeted all over the
   web.  That password enabled the game's cheat menu, which I used to switch on
   invincibility.  From there I started working on default-status passwords, by
   gingerly stepping through levels without picking up anything except bullets,
   and only using fists or the pistol to kill monsters when necessary.  This is
   difficult or impossible on most maps, but you can still get some important
   password data this way.
   A few days into my work on that, however, Midway Home Entertainment openly
   released all the default-status passwords for all maps (minus map 1) for all
   skill levels.
   From their list I extrapolated map-1 passwords for all the skill levels.
   Then I noticed that any valid map-1 password turns on the game's Features
   Menu (cheat menu), and so chose one of those passwords as the "official"
   cheat-enabling password for the DOOMCODE file.  (The old password that was
   all over the web started a player at the BE GENTLE! skill level with all
   weapons; The one I built starts a new game at the default BRING IT ON! skill
   level, with the normal starting status of 100% health, 0% armor, a pistol
   and 50 bullets.  Because the "all weapons" option is enabled, my password
   essentially gives the player the choice of starting off with or without
   maximum weapons.)
   In May 1997 I started working on passwords to let a player start new Doom 64
   games with a maximized starting status.  To get those, I used the cheat menu
   to switch on invincibility, then played normally, using a secret exit to get
   to the first Demon Artifact on level 29, and continued on from there.
   Once you get to level 31 (from another secret exit) you can acquire the last
   Demon Artifact, and right before you exit, use the cheat menu to maximize
   ammo.  On leaving 31 you get a password that lets you start on map 19 with
   EVERYTHING.  From there you can play the rest of the game, yielding a total
   of 7 passwords with maximum-start information.
   That was for the BE GENTLE! skill level.  The procedure was then repeated on
   WATCH ME DIE! skill.  From those 14 passwords, and from having all the
   minimum-start passwords as an example, I was eventually able to extrapolate
   or reverse-engineer all the rest of them (which was a nightmare compared to
   generating the PlayStation passwords).
   I submitted the four map-1 Maximum-Start passwords (one for each difficulty
   level) to a few distribution hubs on the web, and posted them on a few
   Newsgroups and message boards.  If you see someone else passing them around,
   acting like they did all the work, yell at 'em for me, willya? ;D
   -----
   Addendum 1: Years later in early 2003 I built the Skill 4 low-start password
   lists for Doom games on PSX, Saturn and N64.  I created these to help kill a
   rainy weekend, and perhaps create an interesting challenge for Doom experts.
   Originally I was working for passwords that would give 10% health and only 5
   bullets, but soon noticed that any health value from 1% to 24% is rounded up
   to 25% in the passwords.  To compensate for the mandatory increase in health
   I decided to remove the bullets.  The resulting passwords leave the player
   with as little as possible... In theory a password can't be generated that
   will give a player lower health and equipment levels.
   Of course, many maps in Doom/Doom II have health and ordnance located fairly
   close to their entry points.  These low-start passwords are most challenging
   on maps that aren't quite so accomodating.
   (Side note: While still in the code-breaking mood, I started a similar list
   of passwords for N64 Quake; but then noticed that the game rounds health as
   low as 1% up to 50%, and zero shotgun shells up to 25!  Bah, too easy. ;)
   -----
   Addendum 2: In March of 2004 I went back and finished one of my abandoned
   password lists for Doom 64.  This set provides the player with a maximized
   starting status minus 1 Demon Artifact, which leaves the laser weapon in
   fast twin-beam mode.  The laser is less powerful this way, but it's still a
   very effective weapon, uses less ammo per shot, and fewer beams go flying
   off into space at longer ranges.
   -----
   Addendum 3: In August of 2004 I created a default-plus-SSG password list for
   PlayStation and Saturn Doom.  This is like the default-start password list,
   except that it also provides an empty double-barrelled shotgun, a.k.a. super
   shotgun, SSG, or combat shotgun.
   This password list was made in response to message posts I'd read over the
   years where people expressed a desire to have the SSG in Doom 1 or Ultimate
   Doom.  (This weapon is typically only available in Doom II-based games.)
   Players can now have that weapon in the "ULTIMATE DOOM" Episode of these two
   games, without being limited to "maximum weapons" passwords and cheat codes.
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Q: "Where are the passwords for PSX/Saturn Doom level 60?"
A: There is no level 60 in either game.  A "Level 60: CLUB DOOM 2" password had
   been floating around the Internet for a while, but in reality that password
   (7L3!266DJK) takes a player to level 54: REDEMPTION DENIED.
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Q: "How did you get those map images for the DOOMMAPS resource?"
A: The map images for the DOOMMAPS pages come indirectly from Doom 95 Automap
   screens.  I used Doom 95 so that the images would be similar to what players
   see when looking at their own Automap screens, so long as they're using an
   original PC engine, or an accurate port that maintains the original look.
   Two or more screenshots are taken of each map, since Doom 95 (and many other
   source ports) cannot actually display every pixel of a level all at once in
   a single Automap screen.  Those PCX-format images are then converted to GIF
   format, the player arrow and status bar are deleted, and the images are then
   overlaid and combined to form a single image.  For each map with flashing
   highlights, the image is then converted to a 3-frame animated GIF, and any
   icons/lines/fills are added to both the first and last frame.  This forces
   those highlights to appear on the map even when a web browser is configured
   to cycle frames in an animated GIF only once, or not at all.
   This was all done by hand for each map, using a variety of graphics tools.
   I decided to show keys/exits/secrets/etc. on separate maps, so as not to
   unintentionally reveal more than what some people might want to know.  (For
   example, someone just looking for the location of a specific key on a level
   might not necessarily want all the secret areas revealed, too.)
   The images and supporting HTML took about three months, working off and on.
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Q: "Where can I get the shareware version of Doom II?"
A: Doom II was never released as shareware; it's only available for purchase.
   You can buy Doom games cheap these days.  Look for the individual games, or
   the commercially-sold combo packs "The Depths of Doom Trilogy" (Ultimate
   Doom, Doom II, and the Master Levels), or "The Doom Collector's Edition"
   (Ultimate Doom, Doom II, and Final Doom).
   Most individual games or compilations can still be found via eBay or other
   online auctions and retailers.  Wal-Mart and similar big-box retailers may
   still have the Collector's Edition on store shelves.
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Q: "Will you send me the full commercial version of Doom/Doom II/other?"
A: No; I don't deal warez.  Besides, getting software illegally (from anyone)
   is a good way to wind up with a virus or other malware.
   You can buy Doom games cheap these days.  Look for the individual games, or
   the commercially-sold combo packs "The Depths of Doom Trilogy" (Ultimate
   Doom, Doom II, and the Master Levels), or "The Doom Collector's Edition"
   (Ultimate Doom, Doom II, and Final Doom).
   Most individual games or compilations can still be found via eBay or other
   online auctions and retailers.  Wal-Mart and similar big-box retailers may
   still have the Collector's Edition on store shelves.
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Q: "Is there a patch to fix that error in PC Final Doom/TNT map 31: PHARAOH?"
A: Yes, a patch to correct this error is available from Team TNT.  Access their
   home page at http://www.teamtnt.com and click on "Bugs & Fixes".
   (Some additional information on the TNT31.WAD patch file can be found here.)
   Note however, that you don't NEED a patch in order to play this level and
   exit successfully.  To access a demo that shows how to exit map 31 without
   keys, cheat codes, or file patches, click here, and look for the demo called
   TNT31EX.LMP.
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Q: "While no-clipping in PC Final Doom, I found a 'Doom guy' in a tiny room!"
A: In old-school Doom jargon, it's known as a Voodoo Doll, and is used as trick
   device to force a change on a player outside of normal gameplay action.
   A Doom map can be set up to have two start positions for one specific player
   character in a Single-player or Cooperative game.  When that map is loaded,
   that player character essentially appears at both positions simultaneously:
   You see the game from one of the two locations, the "Voodoo Doll" is at the
   other.  Map-makers can take advantage of this by engineering events at the
   Voodoo Doll's location, which in turn affect what you experience.
   In Final Doom, the most common use for Voodoo Dolls is to drop them onto
   weapons in order make those weapons spontaneously appear in your inventory.
   They are also creatively used in several third-party Doom/Doom II WADs.
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Q: "Where can I get more information on Doom games?"
A: For starters I'd suggest checking out the links page or the message boards.
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Q: "Will you add my Doom link to your website?"
A: Right now I want to keep my list of links short, and confined to large,
   long-established Doom sites or data hubs like id Software, Doomworld, and
   The Official Doom FAQ.
   I will consider adding sites like the ones I already link to, so if you have
   something comparable, feel free to suggest it.  I'm mostly interested in
   sites that provide unique or hard-to-find content which is useful to players
   of the original classic PC or console Doom/Doom II/Final Doom games.
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Q: "Do you plan to support the Doom 3 games?"
A: I may eventually put up a page of walkthrough demos for the PC Doom 3 game.
   No other Doom 3 content is planned right now.
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